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Fauna


The number of wildlife species calling the area around Siempre Verde home is vast. They include the following.

Mammals

Spectacled Bear
 Tremarctos ornatus
 "Oso andino"
  
Kinkajou
 Potos flavus
 
South American Coati
 Nasua nasua
 "Kuchumbe"
 
Long-tailed weasel
 Mustela frenata
 "Nutria"
 
Striped hog-nosed skunk
 Conepatus semistriatus
 "Sorro"
 
Puma or Mountain lion
 Felis concolor
 "Puma"
 
Oncilla
 Felis tigrina
 "Tigrillo"
 
Red brocket deer
 Mazama americana
 "Cabra"
 
Grass Mouse
 Akodon urichi
 "Raton"
 
Bats (unknown species)
 
Armadillo (unkown species)
 
Porcupine (unkown species) 
 "Eriso"
 
Paca (unknown species)
 "Guanta"
 
Black-rumped Agouti
 Dasyprocta prymnolapha
 "Cuyago"
 
Rabbit (unknown species)
 
Anderson's gray four-eyed opossum
 Philander andersoni
 "Raposa" (possible confusion w/ gray opposum)
 
Squirrel (unknown species)
 "Ardilla"

Birds

Cathartidae - New World Vultures
Turkey Vulture
Black Vulture

Accipitridae - Hawks, Kites, and Eagles
White-rumped Hawk
Plain-breasted Hawk

Falconidae - Falcons and Caracaras
American Kestrel

Cracidae - Guans, Chachalacas, and Curassows
Wattled Guan
Sickle-winged Guan

Odontophoridae - New World Quail
Dark-backed Wood-Quail

Columbidae - Doves and Pigeons
Band-tailed Pigeon
White-tipped Dove

Psittacidae - Parrots
Red-billed Parrot
Scaly-naped Amazon

Cuculidae - Cuckoos and Anis
Squirrel Cuckoo

Strigidae - Typical Owls
Rufescent Screech-Owl
White-throated Screech-Owl
Mottled Owl
Rufous-banded Owl

Nyctibiidae - Potoos
Common Potoo

Caprimulgidae - Nightjars
Rufous-bellied Nighthawk
Band-winged Nightjar

Apodidae - Swifts
White-collared Swift
Chestnut-collared Swift

Trochilidae - Hummingbirds
Tawny-bellied Hermit
Speckled Hummingbird
Booted Racket-tail
Purple-throated Woodstar
White-bellied Woodstar
Green Violetear
Rufous-tailed Hummingbird
Western Emerald
Sword-billed Hummingbird
Collared Inca
Buff-Winged Starfrontlet
Violet-tailed Sylph
Buff-tailed Coronet
Tyrian Metaltail
Gorgeted Sunangel

Trogonidae - Trogons
Masked Trogon
Crested Quetzal

Corvidae - Crows, Jays, Ravens, and Magpies
Turquoise Jay
Beautiful  Jay

Capitonidae - New World Barbets
Toucan Barbet

Ramphastidae - Toucans
Crimson-rumped Toucanet
Plate-billed Mountain-Toucan

Picidae - Woodpeckers
Powerful Woodpecker
Crimson-mantled Woodpecker
Smoky-brown Woodpecker

Furnariidae - Woodcreepers and Ovenbirds
Tyrannine Woodcreeper
Strong-billed Woodcreeper
Montane Woodcreeper
Azara's Spinetail
Rufous Spinetail
Pearled Treerunner
Rusty-winged Barbtail
Streaked Tuftedcheek
Flammulated Treehunter
Striped Treehunter

Thamnophilidae - Antbirds
Long-tailed Antbird
Dusky Antbird

Grallariidae - Antpittas
Chestnut-crowned Antpitta
Chestnut-naped Antpitta

Rhinocryptidae - Tapaculos
Ocellated Tapaculo
Ash-coloured Tapaculo
Unicolored Tapaculo
Spillmann's Tapaculo

Tyrannidae - Tyrant Flycatchers
Black-capped Tyrannulet
Tawny-rumped Tyrannulet
Southern Beardless-Tyrannulet
Streak-necked Flycatcher
Olive-striped Flycatcher
Sierran Elaenia
Rufous-crowned Tody-Flycatcher
Rufous-headed Pygmy-Tyrant
Cinnamon Flycatcher
White-tailed Tyrannulet
White-banded Tyrannulet
Smoke-colored Pewee
Flavescent Flycatcher
Streak-throated Bush-Tyrant
Smoky Bush-Tyrant
Rufous-breasted Chat-Tyrant
Slaty-backed Chat-Tyrant
Yellow-bellied Chat-Tyrant
Black Phoebe
Tropical Kingbird
Golden-crowned Flycatcher

Cotingidae - Cotingas
Green-and-black Fruiteater
Andean Cock-of-the-Rock 

Hirundinidae - Swallows
Blue-and-white Swallow

Troglodytidae - Wrens
Rufous Wren
Plain-tailed Wren
Mountain Wren
Gray-breasted Wood-Wren

Vireonidae - Vireos
Brown-capped Vireo

Cinclidae - Dippers
White-capped Dipper

Turdidae - Thrushes
Andean Solitaire
Slaty-backed Nightingale-Thrush
Great Thrush
Glossy-black Thrush

Parulidae - New World Warblers
Tropical Parula
Slate-throated Whitestart
Spectacled Whitestart
Black-crested Warbler
Three-striped Warbler
Russet-crowned Warbler

Thraupidae - Tanagers
Capped Conebill
Masked Flowerpiercer
White-sided Flowerpiercer
Fawn-breasted Tanager
Golden Tanager
Saffron-crowned Tanager
Flame-faced Tanager
Metallic-green Tanager
Golden-naped Tanager
Scrub Tanager
Beryl-spangled Tanager
Blue-and-black Tanager
Black-capped Tanager
Blue-winged Mountain-Tanager
Hooded Mountain-Tanager
Masked Mountain-Tanager
Grass-green Tanager
Blue-gray Tanager
Blue-capped Tanager
Rufous-chested Tanager
Black-eared Hemispingus
Yellow-bellied Seedeater
Plushcap
Fringillidae - Finches, Euphonias, and Siskins
Golden-rumped Euphonia
Orange-bellied Euphonia
Cardinalidae - Cardinals
Southern Yellow-Grosbeak
Emberizidae - Sparrows and Finches
Dusky Bush-Tanager
White-winged Brush-Finch
Slaty Brush-Finch
Stripe-headed Brush-Finch
Rufous-collared Sparrow

From Bats to Bears

Nathan Muchhala, a renowned bat researcher, visited Siempre Verde in November 2009. After a week of mistnetting bats, Muchhala and his team caught 48 individuals from nine species, one of which has yet to be identified. They also confirmed at least nine species of bat-pollinated flowers and took nectar and pollen samples for later analysis. Muchhala was searching for a specific bat species he identified for the first time ever in 2006. He didn’t find it on this trip, but found multiple flowers of a plant specifically pollinated by that species, so he is optimistic he will find it on his next visit. He wrote, saying “[Siempre Verde] turns out to be a bit of a paradise for nectar bats,” with a “remarkably high density of bat-pollinated flowers.” This is not surprising because bats make up a very important part of the pollination ecology of high elevation cloudforests. This type of research provides so much insight into an otherwise under-appreciated forest inhabitant.

The Spectacled Bear (Tremarctos ornatus) is South America’s only bear species and one of the most important conservation symbols in the Andes. This small bear (avg. 300-400 lbs.) is a shy tree dweller and mostly vegetarian. But it is now threatened with extinction largely because like us, it loves corn, which makes for unfriendly relationships with local farmers. Recently, we spotted two cubs in or near the reserve and found numerous signs of bears using the Arriba Trail. The Andean Bear Project operates out of the nearby town of Pucará and regularly tracks bears at Siempre Verde.

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